Candelabra Bombe Alaska Cake

Intermediate
1 Day (with ready ice cream)
RRP
$190 - $220

Learn how to make a Bombe Alaska cake in the theme of a candelabra.

I’ve always really appreciated the classic desserts. When I entered the pastry kitchen in the 1970’s, they were part of our everyday. We made them for big banquets where the lights would go out and scores of waiters paraded in to the room with flaming ice cream in their hands. Most of these classic desserts have a story behind them and were served to royalties and celebrities. Some were even created for and name specifically after them. What I am going to do today is one of those classic desserts. It’s not named after a prince or princess but I will be making it for my Prince and Princess (my grandchildren) and for you. 2 of my grandchildren have their birthday’s 2 days apart so we are going to celebrate on the same day and I will be making one cake for both of them. The boy is into Harry potter and the girl likes Disney princesses. Unusually, they asked for an Ice Cream cake this time so I thought a classic Bombe Alaska combined with a Candelabra theme to match the era, would be a good option. Hope you guys enjoy the tutorial!

Downloadable Course Material

If you would like to approximately match the size of the artwork in the tutorial, print the downloadable files at 100% size. If you require your artwork to be smaller or larger, just adjust the print size accordingly.
Candelabra Bombe Alaska Cake Course Material
This PDF document contains templates and guides to help you with this tutorial.

Track
Duration
Introduction
2:03
Drawing the Plan
4:47
Tools & Ingredients
5:23
Cutting the Sponge
2:21
Cutting the Ice Cream
2:16
Piping the Candelabra
10:45
Air-brushing
4:06
Making the Picture Frames
10:10
Whipping the Meringue
5:28
Coating with Meringue
7:30
Placing the Candelabra
5:48
Adding the Candles
2:43
Retouching Gold Luster
1:47
Final Thoughts
1:35
Total Duration
1:07:50

While not everything on this list is absolutely required, these are the things used in this tutorial video. Of course you are welcome to find alternative ways of doing things and we would love to hear if you've discovered an easier method or better tool to achieve good results. Please note that some items may be listed as sets, and it is usually recommended to have full sets, it may not be neccessary. In most cases, only one item from a set is actually used in the tutorial. Please watch the tutorial before purchasing any items to make sure you are not buying anything you don't need.
Tools & Materials
Mixing Bowl
25cm round

Use as a mould

Plate
35cm - 40cm round

Glass or Porcelain, use as base

Mixing bowl
3 litre size

For whipping Meringue

Star Nozzle
6mm
Disposable Pastry Bags Shop Online
Cellophane Shop Online
Long knife

For cutting sponge

Pallet Knife

For merinque

Knife
Large

For cutting Ice cream

Gas Torch
Scissors
Gold Luster
Mixed with alcohol

For spraying Chocolate ornaments

Airbrush Set Shop Online
Hand Towels
Ensure fibers are not loose.
Small paint brush

For gold touch up

Chocolate Transfers

with right size relevant pictures

Corrugated Cardboard
Great for placing sugar items to dry. Easy to move around.
Recipes & Ingredients
Ice Cream

3 litres

Vanilla Strawberry
Chocolate

1kg for 5cm height, 25cm round cake

One of the most used cake bases for wedding and novelty cake makers because of its buttery firm and light texture to build large cakes. Also preferred by mums to please choosy kids. Butter cakes are easy to carve for shaped...[read more]

Meringue

- 250g fresh egg white
- 500g Sugar

White Chocolate (Compound) Wikipedia

For Chocolate transfers background

Compound chocolate is a product made from a combination of cocoa, vegetable fat, and sweeteners. It is used as a lower-cost alternative to true chocolate, as it uses less-expensive hard vegetable fats such as coconut oil or palm kernel oil in place of the more expensive cocoa butter. It may also be known as 'compound coating' or 'chocolatey coating' when used as a coating for candy.
Dark Chocolate (Compound) Wikipedia

For piped ornaments

Compound chocolate is a product made from a combination of cocoa, vegetable fat, and sweeteners. It is used as a lower-cost alternative to true chocolate, as it uses less-expensive hard vegetable fats such as coconut oil or palm kernel oil in place of the more expensive cocoa butter. It may also be known as 'compound coating' or 'chocolatey coating' when used as a coating for candy.

5 Comments

  • A very beautiful cake more like a piece of art but can you tell us where and how do you keep this cake until you are ready to serve it do you put it in the freezer of the fridge.
    Thank you for sharing your talent with us I can only hope that I can be a third as talented as you are and I will be extremely happy witching your grandchildren a wonderful happy birthday 💞

  • Another fantastic video. Will you be my grandfather :). I haven’t made anything yet I’m so involved with watching your videos.

  • Thank you – delightful! Please can we have back the sub-titles, for those of us who cannot hear as well as we used to? Also – I cannot find details of the candles you used, what size and where did you obtain them (a link perhaps?)

    • Hi Dawn, tutorials on our website have never had subtitles (with the exception of a couple). All our Youtube tutorials have subtitles because we use Youtube’s system to do it. For our website though, it is a manual and a very labor intensive process unfortunately. As much as we would love to have subtitles for all our premium tutorials, it is simply not possible at this time but maybe in the future. Regarding the candles, Serdar just purchased them from a local super market (Woolworths) in the party section. Thank you

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